Library

(Yes.  Yes it does!)

Great Style Reads

Join me, my fellow stylish book nerds, and check out some of my favorite fashion and beauty books:




There's a reason How to Get Dressed became a best seller.  Allison Freer is a costume designer and style wizard who offers great advice on how to make your clothes work for you, no matter what size, shape or age.  Most of all, she makes it fun to get dressed. Let me quote from the description:

Instead of repeating boring style “rules,” Alison breaks the rules and gets real about everything from bras to how to deal with inevitable fashion disasters.

She even has tips for avoiding dry cleaning.  This woman needs to be my new best friend.



But, but, but ... it's important to follow what's in style, right?  Before you answer that, take a look back on some of the most interesting, weird and just plain regrettable clothing styles throughout history. (Someday I'm sure they will include 2016's questionable half-tucked shirt look, but I digress.) Why'd They Wear That is a fun read for both kids and adults, and a great way to talk to your daughters about some of the most silly aspects of fashion.




Ari Seth Cohen is the brilliant creator of one of my favorite blogs of all time.  In a society that makes women fear aging from about the age of 24, Ari's joy-filled posts of elder fashionistas are proof of a wonderful style rebellion.  The cult of youth just can't hold a candle to these ladies and their decades of bold sartorial glee.  Advanced Style and the follow up Advanced Style, Older and Wiser are inspirational for stylish women of all ages.



(Be sure to check out the fantastic documentary, too!)




Fifty Dresses that Changed the World is a fascinating look at the power of a dress to transcend the moment and become an icon.   The Design Museum offers a droolworthy look at famous frocks of Wallis Simpson, Jackie Kennedy, Twiggy, Cher, Princess Di and many more.  (The only problem is how much you'll want to click on the images to order them.)




Grab a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, put the phone on Do Not Disturb and prepare yourself to dive into a fascinating, gorgeous look at 100 Years of Fashion.  Covering designs from 1900 to present day, this book is a must-have for fashion lovers and history buffs.




First of all, Christie Brinkley can't possibly be human.  I think she must come from some faraway planet where women don't actually age but, instead, get even more beautiful after they turn 60.  (SHE IS OVER 60, PEOPLE!)

In Timeless Beauty, Christie offers great tips for staying gorgeous and getting your groove back through healthy dietary and lifestyle choices as well as great skin care.  I'm waiting for the follow-up where she confesses that she really drinks the blood of virgins to look like that, but until then I'm happy for the excellent advice she offers in this book.  (I think she's really on to something with her raw, anti-inflammatory diet choices.)



Makeup lovers rejoice: Facepaint is a comprehensive look at the history of makeup, going all the way back into ancient history.  This is a fascinating look at one of the oldest forms of human adornment and expression.



If the personal is political, what could be more personal than the clothes and accessories we choose to wear every day?  In Slow Fashion Sophia Minney argues that sustainability is the future of fashion, and restorative economics will play a part in not only the planet's well-being, but our own.  With beautiful full color photos and design, this is a fascinating, inspiring read.  Find out more about the thoughtfully stylish people challenging the mainstream.  Fashion doesn't have to be shallow, wasteful or disposable.